Today at Berkeley Lab nameplate Berkeley Lab
Friday, April 15, 2005
CALENDAR

Today

10 a.m.
Earth Sciences
Introduction to Henderson DUSEL: Unearthing the Secret of Universe Underground
Kevin Lesko
127 Dwinelle Hall, campus

10:30 a.m.
Center for Beam Physics
Angular Momentum Dominated Electron Beam and Flat Beam
Yin-e Sun, U. of Chicago
Bldg. 71-264

Noon
Employee Activities Assoc.
Yoga Class with Naomi Hartwig ($10/$12)
Bldg. 70A-3377

1 p.m.
Scientific Computing
Distributed Algorithms for Partitioning and Other Canonical Network Tasks
Sandip Roy, Washington State U.
Bldg. 50A-5132

1 p.m.
Distributed Systems
Secure Collaboration: Concepts and Tools
Perseverance Hall

Monday

Noon
Employee Activities Assoc.
Yoga Class with Inna Belogolovsky ($10/$12)
Bldg. 70A-3377

3 p.m.
Nanoscale Science & Engineering Graduate Group
Nanophotonics for Communications and Medicine
Mehmet Fatih Yanik, Stanford Division of Applied Physics
3110 Etcheverry Hall

CAFETERIA

Morning Editions:
Biscuits and Gravy with Two Eggs
Monday's Breakfast: Breakfast Quesadillas with Home Fries
Market Carvery: Fish & Chips
Fresh Grille: Sweet And Sour Chicken over Rice
Menutainment: Viva El Burrito! Chicken or Pork

B'fast: 6:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Lunch: 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Full menu


Chu: ‘Termite Guts
Can Save The Planet’

Chu

The way termite guts process food could teach scientists how to produce pollution-free energy and help solve the world's imminent energy crisis. Speaking at the Institute of Physics conference Physics 2005 in Warwick, England, on Wednesday, Lab Director and Nobel laureate Steven Chu urged scientists to turn their attention to finding an environmentally friendly form of fuel. In an impassioned plea to some of the world's brightest minds, he explained how he's leading by example, and encouraged others to join the effort which "may already be too late." Full story.

ANNOUNCEMENTS


ASD to Offer Franklin
Covey’s Four Disciplines

Have you ever wondered how to get your group or team to execute on its strategic goals? ASD is offering an all-day seminar on Franklin Covey’s Four Disciplines of Execution. Help unleash the power of the workforce by learning how to identify, focus on and execute top business priorities. The course is designed for managers and supervisors. The workshop will take place next Friday, April 22 from 8 a.m to 5 p.m. There is a small fee for non-ASD employees. Go here to register.


Cryptography Course
Enrollment Open

Enrollment is still open for the Cryptography course offered by the Computer Protection Program. The course will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. next Tuesday in the Building 50 auditorium. Enrollment is limited. For a full course description go here. To enroll go here.

 


Environmental Fair
To Honor Earth Month

April is Earth Month, and the Lab is celebrating next Thursday with an Environmental Fair. On hand will be representatives from EH&S, Vegetation Management, the Lab’s Green Team, the Outdoor Club, Rebuilding Together, and more. Come to get your bike tuned up courtesy of The Bicycle Coalition, learn about new ways to save energy in your home, or pick up a free plant from Boise Cascade. The Fair will take place on the lawn area outside the cafeteria from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

PEOPLE


Sudar Steps Down,
Rishell Named Deputy

Sudar

Life Sciences Division Director Joe Gray has announced that his Deputy, Damir Sudar, has stepped down after four years in the position. Gray, in citing Sudar for his "outstanding and heroic work, commitment and insight that have been extremely valuable for our division and the Lab," indicated that he would devote his time to his research in biomedical imaging and analysis. Gray also announced that Rebecca Rishell, senior business manager for Life Sciences and Genomics, will add the Divisions' Operations Deputy role to her responsibilities. A thank-you event for Sudar is scheduled for May 5.

IN THE NEWS


Bacteria Genes Lurk
In Fly Genome
By Sharon Tang-Quan

Like the friend who finds your cell phone where no one else bothered to look, one UC Berkeley geneticist takes into consideration what other scientists may often neglect. After scientists sequenced the genomes of seven species of fruit fly last year, Michael B. Eisen, a UC Berkeley professor of molecular and cell biology and a faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab, bothered to look at what was inside the fruit fly embryos. Full story.

WEATHER
Mostly sunny.
High: 67 (19 C).
IMAGE: Weather icon
Extended Forecast
SECURITY CONDITION
SECON level 3


More Information
INFO
Current issue button
Previous issue button
Submission guidelines button
Archives button
IMAGE: DOE logo IMAGE: Office of Science logo IMAGE: UC logo